Ken Dilanian

  • An MQ-9 Reaper equipped with an extended range modification from the 62nd Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron sits on the ramp at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, Dec. 6, 2015. The ER modification allows for 20 to 40 percent additional flight time dependent on the aircraft's loadout. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Robert Cloys/Released)
    As military handles drone strikes, less scrutiny by Congress

    Putting the U.S. military in charge of drone strikes in Iraq and Syria has effectively reduced congressional scrutiny of those sensitive operations, leaving some activists, lawmakers and U.S. intelligence officials fearful of increased civilian casualties.

  • FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 16, 2015 file photo, an employee of the Doctors Without Borders hospital looks at damages after a U.S. airstrike hit in Kunduz, Afghanistan. Two servicemen have told Congress that American special forces called in an air strike on a hospital in Afghanistan because they believed the Taliban were using it as a command center, contradicting the military’s explanation that the attack was meant for a different building. (AP Photo/Najim Rahim, File)
    Lawmaker: Were U.S. forces manipulated into striking hospital?

    Two servicemen have told Congress that American special forces called in an air strike on a hospital in Afghanistan because they believed the Taliban were using it as a command center, contradicting the military's explanation that the attack was meant for a different building.

  • FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2015 file photo, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Obama administration is announcing a new intelligence-sharing arrangement with France to more readily and quickly share military planning regarding the campaign against the Islamic State. After President Barack Obama announced the arrangement to reporters in Turkey, the Pentagon says Defense Secretary Ash Carter and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper have authorized military personnel to share information quickly with their French counterparts. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
    U.S. to increase intel sharing with France

    The Obama administration announced Monday a new intelligence-sharing arrangement with France designed to more readily and quickly allow joint military planning in the campaign against the Islamic State.

  • An Afghan National Army soldier stands guard at the gate of a Doctors without Borders hospital after U.S. troops left the area in Kunduz, Afghanistan, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015. Taliban fighters took control of the key northern city late last month, leading to a protracted battle with Afghan forces supported by U.S. airstrikes. During the fighting, a U.S. air attack hit the hospital, killing at least 12 Doctors Without Borders staff and 10 patients. (AP Photo/Najim Rahim)
    U.S. troops didn't have eyes on Afghan hospital before attack

    Immediately after the U.S. killed at least 30 people in a devastating airstrike on a charity hospital, Afghanistan's national security adviser told a European diplomat his country would take responsibility because "we are without doubt, 100 percent convinced the place was occupied by Taliban," according to notes of the meeting reviewed by The Associated Press.

  • This photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, taken Aug. 11, 2010, shows an AC-130 Spectre from the 16th Special Operations Squadron flying a training mission at Cannon Air Force Base, N. M. The Army Green Berets who called in the deadly strike on the Doctors without Borders trauma center in Afghanistan were aware it was a functioning hospital but believed it was under Taliban control, raising questions about whether the air strike violated international law. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jack Braden via AP)
    U.S. troops who sought strike thought Taliban had hospital

    The Army Green Berets who requested the Oct. 3 airstrike on the Doctors without Borders trauma center in Afghanistan were aware it was a functioning hospital but believed it was under Taliban control, The Associated Press has learned. The information adds to the evidence the site was familiar to the U.S. and raises questions about whether the attack violated international law.

  • The damaged hospital in which the Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) medical charity operated is seen on October 13, 2015 following an air strike in the northern city of Kunduz. Thirty-three people are still missing days after a US air strike on an Afghan hospital, the medical charity has warned, sparking fears the death toll could rise significantly. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
    Army intelligence system allegedly down during hospital attack

    The Army's $5 billion intelligence network, which is designed to give commanders battlefield awareness but has been criticized for years as a boondoggle, was not working in Afghanistan during the recent American air attack on a hospital,

  • Christopher Stokes, second left, the general director of Doctors Without Borders and his colleague stand as an Afghan National Army vehicle guards at the gate of its hospital after U.S. troops left the area in Kunduz, Afghanistan, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015. Taliban fighters took control of the key northern city late last month, leading to a protracted battle with Afghan forces supported by U.S. airstrikes. During the fighting, a U.S. air attack hit the hospital, killing at least 12 Doctors Without Borders staff and 10 patients. (AP Photo/Najim Rahim)
    U.S. analysts knew Afghan site was hospital

    Days before the Oct. 3 U.S. air attack on a hospital in Afghanistan, American special operations analysts were gathering intelligence on the facility — which they knew was a protected medical site — because they believed it was being used by a Pakistani operative to coordinate Taliban activity, The Associated Press has learned.