The Pentagon has identified a soldier who died at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, on Wednesday.

Spc. Branden Tyme Kimball died in a non-combat related incident, the Defense Department said in a press release, adding that the incident is under investigation.

Kimball was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 10th Aviation Regiment, 10th Combat Aviation Brigade, out of Fort Drum, New York.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of SPC Branden Kimball during this very difficult time," division spokesman Lt. Col. Kamil Sztalkoper said in a statement. "The loss of any Mountain Soldier has a lasting impact on every member of the team. The 10th Mountain Division mourns the loss of SPC Kimball, he will be missed from our formations.”

The 21-year-old Kimball was a native of Central Point, Oregon. He served as an aircraft structural repairer while in the service.

Kimball joined the Army in August 2016 and following basic combat training and advanced individual training, he was assigned to 10th Mountain Division.

His awards and decorations include the National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Overseas Service Ribbon, and the Army Service Ribbon.

The deceased soldier is survived by his mother.

The 10th Mountain Division Combat Aviation Brigade replaced the 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade in Afghanistan this winter.

Kyle Rempfer is an editor and reporter whose investigations have covered combat operations, criminal cases, foreign military assistance and training accidents. Before entering journalism, Kyle served in U.S. Air Force Special Tactics and deployed in 2014 to Paktika Province, Afghanistan, and Baghdad, Iraq.

Share:
More In Your Army
In Other News
US, China sparring over Taiwan heats up anew
The United States and China are stepping up their war of words over Taiwan in a long-simmering dispute that has significant implications for the power dynamic in the Indo-Pacific and beyond.
Congress plans fixes for US military’s AWOL weapons problems
Congress is set to force America’s armed services to keep better track of their guns and explosives, imposing new rules in response to an Associated Press investigation that showed firearms stolen from U.S. bases have resurfaced in violent crimes.
Load More